Everything you need to know about looking after your timber deck!

Our top 5 tips on how best to protect your deck this summer

Preserve the timber and keep it looking fresh by giving your deck a new coat of stain or decking oil. Once the surface is prepared, it’s a simple job to stain the timber with a brush or a Cabot’s Decking Oil Applicator.

Tip 1:   Timber decking does not need to be coated immediately after it has been laid.

Tip 2:   The best way to remove the tannin from your timber is to use Intergrain Ultraprep tannin and oil remover. Make sure your clean your deck properly prior to using decking oil or stain, by doing so it will ensure you get a longer lifespan from your timber deck.

Tip 3:   If mould is an issue use Intergrain Mould Killer. Mould becomes an issue in areas with high humidity or wet conditions. The Mackay and Whitsunday region are regularly humid over the summer months; therefore, Intergrain Mould Killer is recommended to ensure you receive a longer lifespan from your deck.

Tip 4:   Generally, the darker the pigment (colour) the higher the UV protection level.  It’s important to protect your timber deck from UV rays, just like you do with your own skin. Acrylics or water-based finished tend to be more durable and three coats can be applied in a shorter time span.

Tip 5:   More expensive coats tend to last longer and require less maintenance. More expensive coatings have more ingredients; hence they are dearer. Cheaper coatings may be more economical in the short term but unless you are thinking of moving out before maintenance is required spend a little more, it will be worthwhile in the long run!

How to prepare your timber deck before you stain

Step 1: Remove all tannin from your timber. The most effective way to do this is by using Intergrain Ultraprep tannin and oil remover.

Step 2: Clean the surface of the deck and remove all stains. Any specific timber cleaner is suitable.  Our favourites are Feast Watson woodclean, Cabots Deck Clean, and Intergrain Ultraprep timber cleaner.

Step 3: This step is optional, however highly recommended for the Mackay and Whitsunday region. Use Intergrain mould killer to protect your deck and expand the lifespan of the deck.

This entire process may sound long and feel like a complicated procedure, but it will save you a lot of work and heartache in the long run. Make sure you look after your deck and protect it, by doing so it will reduce the maintenance required in the future and expand the lifetime of your deck.

After you clean your deck you are ready to begin coating the timber. Timber is like your own skin, it needs protection from harmful UV rays. There are two main types ‘Oil’ and ‘Acrylics’. Something to keep in mind here is the VOC levels (Volatile Organic Compounds).

All exterior timber coatings must have some sort of pigment (colour) in them to provide UV protection. As a general rule, the darker the pigment the higher the protection level. You will find that the majority of deck finished are classed as natural, this is virtually a clear with a slight orange tinge or pigment. Stained or more highly coloured finishes are now becoming more common, once you’ve recoated your deck a couple of times you will understand why.

Another thing to remember is that, like most things you purchase, you get what you are pay for. More expensive coatings have more ingredients; hence they are dearer. Cheaper coatings may be more economical in the short term (Turps & Linseed Oil is cheap), but unless you are thinking of moving out before maintenance is required, spend a bit more, it will be worthwhile.

How to Stain your deck

Step 1: Ensure that your deck is clean, you have removed all tannan and stains with a timber deck cleaner.

Step 2: Use masking tape to tape up any area’s you don’t want to be stained.

Step 3: Stain the edges and corners of the deck with a paint brush

Step 4: Stain the larger deck area with a Cabots Decking Oil Applicator. Dip the applicator into the paint tray, making sure you                                  take a moderate amount of stain with each dip. Use long, even strokes to stain the timber, blending in as you go.